A national Native American non-profit organization, the Native American Fish & Wildlife Society, serves as a communication medium for self-determined Native American fish and wildlife managers.

We serve as a communication network between tribal, federal, and state fish and wildlife management entities.

These tribes have sent Letters of Support for Recovering America's Wildlife Act, HR-3742:

Letter From

State

Yakama Nation

WA

Quinalt Indian Nation

WA

Walker River Paiute Tribe

NV

Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission

WA

Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin

WI

Hopi Tribe

AZ

Point No Point Treaty Council

WA

Quileute Tribal Council

WA

Chippewa Ottowa Resource Authority

MI

Yurok Tribe

CA

Stillaguamish Tribe of Indians

WA

Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians

NC

Cheyenne River Sioux Tribe

SD

Pueblo of Santa Ana

NM

Southwest Tribal Fisheries Commission

NM

1854 Treaty Authority

MN

Oneida Nation

WI

Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe

MN

Lac Courte Oreillies

WI

Lummi Indian Business Council

WA

Makah Tribe

WA

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation

MT

Lower Brule Sioux Tribe

SD

Pokagon Band of Potawatomi Indians

MI

The Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians

MI

Santee Sioux

NE

Osage Nation

OK

Chippewa Cree Tribes of the Rocky Boy's Reservation

MT

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community

MI

Swinomish Indian Tribal Community

WA

Wind River - East Shoshone Tribe and Northern Arapaho Tribes

WY

Kootenai Tribe of Idaho

ID

Northern Cheyenne Tribe

MT

Blackfeet Nation

MT

Montana-Wyoming Tribal Fish and Wildlife Commission

MT/WY

Ft. Peck Tribes Assiniboine and Sioux

MT

Fond da lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa

MN

Oglala Sioux Tribe

SD

Rosebud Sioux Tribe

SD

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

MS

Southern Ute Indian Tribe

CO

Nez Perce Tribe

ID

Native Village of Kotzebue

AK

NATURAL RESOURCES
Panel approves bipartisan wildlife funding bill

Kellie Lunney, E&E News reporter
Published: Thursday, December 5, 2019

Major wildlife conservation legislation advanced today with the support of Democrats and Republicans during a House committee markup.

Read More here : https://www.eenews.net/eenewspm/stories/1061733229/feed

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

PRESIDENT

Fawn R. Sharp Quinault Indian Nation

FIRST VICE-PRESIDENT

Aaron Payment

Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Chippewa Indians

RECORDING SECRETARY

Juana Majel-Dixon

Pauma Band of Luiseño Indians

TREASURER

Clinton Lageson Kenaitze Indian Tribe

REGIONAL VICE-PRESIDENTS

ALASKA

Rob Sanderson, Jr.

Tlingit & Haida Indian Tribes of Alaska

EASTERN OKLAHOMA

Norman Hildebrand

Wyandotte Nation

GREAT PLAINS

Larry Wright, Jr.

Ponca Tribe of Nebraska

MIDWEST

Shannon Holsey

Stockbridge Munsee Band of

Mohican Indians

NORTHEAST

Tina Abrams

Seneca Nation of Indians

NORTHWEST

Leonard Forsman

Suquamish Tribe

PACIFIC

Erica Mae Macias

Cahuilla Band of Indians

ROCKY MOUNTAIN

MARK POLLOCK

Blackfeet Nation

SOUTHEAST

Nancy Carnley

Ma-Chis Lower Creek Indian

Tribe of Alabama

SOUTHERN PLAINS

Robert Tippeconnie

Comanche Nation

SOUTHWEST

Vacant

WESTERN

Alan Mandell

Pyramid Lake Paiute Tribe

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

KEVIN ALLIS

Forest County Potawatomi Community

NCAI HEADQUARTERS
1516 P Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20005
202.466.7767
202.466.7797 fax

www.ncai.org

NATIONAL CONGRESS OF AMERICAN INDIANS

The National Congress of American Indians

The National Congress of American Indians
Resolution #ABQ-19-036

TITLE: Calling on Congress to Support and Pass Recovering America’s Wildlife Act, or Similar Legislation with a Tribal Wildlife Conservation and Restoration Account

WHEREAS, we, the members of the National Congress of American Indians of the United States, invoking the divine blessing of the Creator upon our efforts and purposes, in order to preserve for ourselves and our descendants the inherent sovereign rights of our Indian nations, rights secured under Indian treaties and agreements with the United States, and all other rights and benefits to which we are entitled under the laws and Constitution of the United States, to enlighten the public toward a better understanding of the Indian people, to preserve Indian cultural values, and otherwise promote the health, safety and welfare of the Indian people, do hereby establish and submit the following resolution; and

WHEREAS, the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) was established in 1944 and is the oldest and largest national organization of American Indian and Alaska Native tribal governments; and

WHEREAS, tribal nations have been wildlife managers since time- immemorial and many tribal governments now operate fish and wildlife programs, promote conservation and recovery of fish and wildlife, and regulate hunting and fishing within their traditional lands and areas; and

WHEREAS, tribal nations collaborate, co-manage, and partner with states on the conservation and recovery of fish and wildlife, but do not receive sufficient federal funding to protect and restore these species; and

WHEREAS, proactive tribal engagement in wildlife management is necessary to conserve, protect and restore wildlife resources and prevent the demise of species to the point of requiring listing under the federal Endangered Species Act; and

WHEREAS, NCAI supports federal legislation meant to protect and restore wildlife species that includes tribal nations, and that resources are obligated to tribal nations for law enforcement, fish and wildlife programs, range and habitat management, and other conservation and recovery efforts that tribal nations deem necessary.

NOW THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED, that the National Congress of American Indians (NCAI) calls on Congress to co-sponsor and pass Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (RAWA), or similar legislation, with the inclusion of a tribal wildlife conservation and restoration account that provides long-term, dedicated, and stable funding for tribal wildlife management in addition to a state account created under RAWA; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the NCAI respectfully requests that the legislation ensure a minimum of $97.5 million as an annual allocation for tribal fish and wildlife programs; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the NCAI further supports Congressional direction be provided to the federal government to ensure consultation with tribal nations on the development of an allocation process for distribution of these funds; and

BE IT FINALLY RESOLVED, that this resolution shall be the policy of NCAI until it is withdrawn or modified by subsequent resolution.

CERTIFICATION

The foregoing resolution was adopted by the General Assembly at the 2019 Annual Session of the National Congress of American Indians, held at the Albuquerque Convention Center, October 20-25, 2019, with a quorum present.

Fawn Sharp, President

ATTEST:

Juana Majel Dixon, Recording Secretary

Scientists Support Dedicated At-Risk Species Funding

The undersigned natural resource scientists and managers working in partnership with state and tribal fish and wildlife agencies stand in support of dedicated funding for the conservation of America’s at-risk fish and wildlife. We urge Congress to take up measures that work towards this goal, including the Recovering America’s Wildlife Act.

America harbors a remarkable array of fish and wildlife species, many of which face increased risk of extinction due to threats such as habitat alteration, invasive species, disease, and other problems exacerbated by the impacts of a changing climate. Over one third of these species are in need of immediate conservation action from these human-induced threats, including up to 40 percent of freshwater fish species, 42 percent of amphibian species, and 18 percent of bat species. On a global scale, a recent United Nations report detailed over 1 million species at risk of extinction, with approximately 680 vertebrate species already having gone extinct since the 1500s.

Introduced in House (07/12/2019)

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act of 2019

This bill provides funding for (1) the conservation or restoration of wildlife and plant species of greatest conservation need; (2) the wildlife conservation strategies of states, Indian tribes, or territories; or (3) wildlife conservation education and recreation projects.

The Department of the Interior must use a portion of the funding for a grant program. The grants must be used for innovative recovery efforts for species of greatest conservation need, species listed as endangered or threatened species, or the habitats of such species.

Follow the Bill at: https://www.congress.gov/bill/116th-congress/house-bill/3742

The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (RAWA) will redirect $1.3 billion of existing reve-nue annually to state-led and $97.5 million to Tribal-led wildlife conservation efforts. This would be the most significant investment in wildlife conservation in a generation.The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act (RAWA) will redirect $1.3 billion of existing reve-nue annually to state-led and $97.5 million to Tribal-led wildlife conservation efforts. This would be the most significant investment in wildlife conservation in a generation.This nation is blessed with a diverse array of fish and wildlife, many of which are biologically and culturally important to Tribes. While some species are thriving, many more are facing increasing challenges and are in steep decline. The Recovering America’s Wildlife Act would support Tribal efforts to protect these species and our cultural ties to them. The Tribes believe that now is the time for us to rise to the wild-life conservation challenge that confront us. With the support of this legislation, the Tribes stand ready to ensure that wildlife endures for future generations of Native Americans, and all Americans.

Tribal Conservation and the Impact ofTribal Conservation and the Impact ofRecovering America’s Wildlife Act

Tribal lands and waters are essential for wildlife conservation and conservation opportunities on Tribal lands overshadow any other non-public land conservation opportunity. Tribes own or influence the management of a natural resource base of nearly 140 million acres, including more than:Tribal lands and waters are essential for wildlife conservation and conservation opportunities on Tribal lands overshadow any other non-public land conservation opportunity. Tribes own or influence the management of a natural resource base of nearly 140 million acres, including more than:

  • 730,000 acres of lakes and reservoirs,
  • over 10,000 miles of streams and rivers,
  • over 18 million acres of forested lands.

Tribal lands provide vital habitat for more than 525 federally listed threatened and endangered plants and animals, many of which are both biologically and culturally significant to Tribes.Despite a history of underfunding and exclusion from federal funding, Tribes have some of the most accomplished natural resource programs in the nation and protect hundreds upon hundreds of wildlife species and their habitat.

Recovering America’s Wildlife Act will help Tribes to:

  • Manage wildlife and habitat on their lands as well as collaborate across jurisdictions (e.g., with states, private landowners, etc.) to protect migrating wildlife.Manage wildlife and habitat on their lands as well as collaborate across jurisdictions (e.g., with states, private landowners, etc.) to protect migrating wildlife.
  • Assist in the recovery of threatened and endangered species.
  • Manage, control and prevent invasive species and diseases.
  • Ensure that tribes have the staff capacity to do all they can do to protect wildlife.

The Tribal Title to RAWA would provide resources to Tribes for the conservation and management of all fish, wildlife and flora on lands within Tribal jurisdictions. RAWA will help remedy past inequity in conservation funding for Tribes and help Tribes play a leadership role in recovering America’s wildlife.